How fares it with the happy dead? by Lord Alfred Tennyson

How fares it with the happy dead?
For here the man is more and more;
But he forgets the days before
God shut the doorways of his head.
The days have vanish'd, tone and tint,
And yet perhaps the hoarding sense
Gives out at times (he knows not whence)
A little flash, a mystic hint;
And in the long harmonious years
(If Death so taste Lethean springs),
May some dim touch of earthly things
Surprise thee ranging with thy peers.

If such a dreamy touch should fall,
O turn thee round, resolve the doubt;
My guardian angel will speak out
In that high place, and tell thee all.

by Lord Alfred Tennyson

Other poems by 'Lord Alfred Tennyson'

Locksley Hall

The Miller's Daughter

Lady Clare

Late, Late, So Late

After-Thought

The Lotos-eaters

Morte D'Arthur

Tithonus

Dedication

Of Old Sat Freedom

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