Sonnets i by William Shakespeare

SHALL I compare thee to a Summer's day?
Thou art more lovely and more temperate:
Rough winds do shake the darling buds of May,
And Summer's lease hath all too short a date:
Sometime too hot the eye of heaven shines,
And often is his gold complexion dimm'd;
And every fair from fair sometime declines,
By chance or nature's changing course untrimm'd:
But thy eternal Summer shall not fade
Nor lose possession of that fair thou owest;
Nor shall Death brag thou wanderest in his shade,
When in eternal lines to time thou growest:
So long as men can breathe, or eyes can see,
So long lives this, and this gives life to thee.

by William Shakespeare

Other poems by 'William Shakespeare'

A Fairy Song

A Lover's Complaint

All the World's a Stage

Aubade

Blow, Blow, Thou Winter Wind

Bridal Song

Carpe Diem

Dirge

Dirge of the Three Queens

Fairy Land ii

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