Wapentake by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow

Poet! I come to touch thy lance with mine;
Not as a knight, who on the listed field
Of tourney touched his adversary's shield
In token of defiance, but in sign
Of homage to the mastery, which is thine,
In English song; nor will I keep concealed,
And voiceless as a rivulet frost-congealed,
My admiration for thy verse divine.
Not of the howling dervishes of song,
Who craze the brain with their delirious dance,
Art thou, O sweet historian of the heart!
Therefore to thee the laurel-leaves belong,
To thee our love and our allegiance,
For thy allegiance to the poet's art.

by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow

Other poems by 'Henry Wadsworth Longfellow'

Flowers

Endymion

The Reaper and the Flowers

Hymn to the Night

The Slave Singing at Midnight

Maidenhood

Afternoon in February

Blind Bartimeus

To the River Charles

Curfew

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